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Increased Fruit And Vegetable Intake Has No Discernible Effect On Weight Loss Increased Fruit And Vegetable Intake Has No Discernible Effect On Weight Loss
Almost everybody has tried to lose some weight at least once, throughout the course of their lives. Some people did it on their own... Increased Fruit And Vegetable Intake Has No Discernible Effect On Weight Loss

Fruit And Vegetable Intake Has No Discernible Effect On Weight Loss

Almost everybody has tried to lose some weight at least once, throughout the course of their lives. Some people did it on their own terms, while others have requested professional help from an experienced dietitian – if this was your case as well, then you certainly know that one of the most common dietary recommendation for those who are trying to shed the extra pounds is to eat more vegetables and fruits. Rich in vitamins and minerals that are essential for the correct functioning of the immune system and low in calories at the same time, fruits and vegetables are generally high in dietary fibers, which means that they will prevent you from feeling hungry again, for several hours. Yet again, some fruits and vegetables are better than others, and that is a known fact!

For years, people were convinced that eating more fruits and vegetables would enable them to get the figure they have always craved for, but a new study actually reveals that an increased intake of fruits and vegetables has actually no discernible effect on one’s weight loss. The explanation for this claim that many might find shocking is rather simple actually: without a compensatory reduction in the overall energy intake, people are unlikely to experience any real weight loss.

A Deeper Insight Into The Study

This study designed to reveal whether an increased intake of fruits and veggies is actually good for your silhouette or not was conducted at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and it was later published in the AJCN, or The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In spite of the fact that an increased intake of fruits and vegetables may not help you lose a lot of weight, they are still good for you and their numerous health benefits cannot be dismissed.The entire study is actually a systematic, in-depth review along with a meta-analysis of data resulted from over 1200 participants, in seven different and randomized control trials. The purpose of these controlled trials was, of course, to monitor those who have increased their overall intake of fruits and veggies, and to see whether it actually helped them lose weight.

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